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Posts Tagged ‘Media & Democracy Coalition’

Media Democracy Coalition’s Hannah Miller rallies against blocked political speech

Supreme Court likely to allow more corporate money in politics

Administration uses ‘State Secrets’ clause to block warrantless wiretap cases

Court rules victim of extraordinary rendition can’t sue from Raw Story

Pirate Cat Radio fined $10,000: East-Bay Express and SF Weekly

Is global warming a corporate fraud? from Project Censored

Real reason climate bill is going to suck from Grist

Palestinians criticize US u-turn on settlements

Detroit Free Press takes editorial cues from advertisers

Congress should not reject the Goldstone Report from Common Dreams

Where are the anti-war demonstrators? from Common Dreams

What Obama is up against from Truthout

MPAA piracy facts unchecked on 60 Minutes

MPAA press release urges FCC to protect content

Bit Torrent’s new peer-to-peer software throttles itself

Nielsen says DTV switch was successful

Paramount says National Broadband Plan should stop Star Trek pirates

Jerry Brown’s spokesman resigns after taping calls

AP admits Cheney equivocated to the FBI

We need a Son of Sam law for coporations from True/Slant

Comcast close to gaining NBC Universal

Brazil encourages competing hackers to crack e-voting terminals

Sen. Cantwell not sure why Geithner still has a job

Service providers in UK ‘should have legal obligation on rural broadband’

Three’s company by Ross Douthat

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Download or stream HERE the Digital Crossroads originally airing 11/14/08.

The Alliance for Community Media West held its annual conference in Denver, Colorado in late October. Denver Open Media hosted the festivities. Digital Crossroads takes you there, with clips recorded on site. Today’s show is an examination of the relevance of community media and the value of youth media literacy.

Denver Open Media is unique. According to Executive Director Tony Shawcross, featured toward the end of the show, on their main channel content might air ten times, but at Denver Open Media viewers can vote as they watch and on the website. The material that is most popular airs on the highlights channel, Channel 57.

Much of the discussion at this year’s conference drove home the point that Public, Educational & Government access or PEG channels must be thinking of ways to modernize. The idea of Cable Access 2.0 is a serious attempt by community television to stay relevant.

Free Speech TVFree Speech TV CEO Dennis Moynihan makes a lunch time presentation, highlighting many programs carried by cable access stations, including his former employer Democracy Now. ACM Western Region Board Chair J Robertson watches the clip.

Today’s show features audio clips from Daniel Weinshenker, who hosted a 90-minute presentation called Digital Storytelling. You can download or stream my audio recording of his entire presentation by clicking HERE. He is director of the Denver office of the non-profit Center for Digital Storytelling.

You will also hear from youth working in access media production. Plus, staff members from Denver Open Media discuss youth media literacy and Glam Camp, the teen girl multimedia production camp.

Beth McConnellBeth McConnell explained how policy advocacy can shape community media’s future. The Media & Democracy Coalition is made up of more than two dozen non-profits who are networking to change the media.

Music on this week’s show by Ooah, The Tasteful Nudes & Gabriel Teodros.

Ann TheisSpecial thanks to Ann Theis, who brings joy and dedication to Denver Open Media. Great people, great materials, great conference! My radio show is produced for Boise Community Radio, KRFP Moscow and other great non-commercial broadcasters. Contact me if you would like to hear the show on your local radio station.

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On the third day, Saturday, I watched Bill Moyers online while waking up, and then hit the convention floor looking for interviews.

The first workshop I checked out was Campus Organizing for Media Reform, which was in fact a simple overview of how to strategize your message when doing outreach. It is amazing to me how straightforward and simple these strategies are, and I only wish I had thought about messaging this way when I started at Evergreen.

Camille Cyprian of Wellstone Action led the discussion, and offered this great rap as an example: “The internet as we know and love it is at risk! Big, private, companies want to block, filter, and discriminate who has online access. Join us and call your Senator today and demand that they support the Net Neutrality Bill, which will ensure that the internet remains accessible for all.”

According to the workshop this rap meets the criteria test for an effective message; it is credible, concise, relevant and compelling. The other key is tailoring an argument to your targeted audience, whether voters, politicians or victims of the problem faced. This net neutrality rap is strong because it addresses a problem, offers a solution, and gives a solid action. WashPIRG is considering a media literacy campaign in the 2008-2009 school year, and this basic criteria seems like it can really help student activists.

After the workshop I interviewed Sam Husseini from the Institute for Public Accuracy who asks powerful people tough questions. I also caught up with Diane Farsetta, Center for Media and Democracy, and we spoke on mic for a half hour! This audio will be featured on Digital Crossroads June 13th and June 20th.

I attended a workshop called New Media, New Models, New Journalism. The panelists were amazing. Dan Gilmour, the director of the Knight Center for Digital Media at Arizona State anchored the discussion, suggesting institutional approaches and so-called citizen journalism are both worthy of attention and investment. Linda Jue talked about the Chauncey Bailey Project in Oakland. Ellen Miller talked about the work of the Sunlight Foundation. And Marcy Wheeler of FireDogLake.com stressed the power independent journalists can have covering tough stories.

Before the end of the afternoon I spoke with Malkia Cyril from Center for Media Justice. She is a visionary who is working toward a better understanding of the structural problems of institutionalized racism we need to overcome in this movement and society at-large. Audio from our interview will air on Digital Crossroads June 13th or 20th.

After dinner with the Paper Dolls Mag ladies and Robert Kam of TCTV, I headed to the Dinkytown neighborhood for the Yo! The Movement benefit. Toki Wright and Big Quarters performed onstage with DJ Benzilla rocking wax. It was a great hip hop show, but I completely missed Shamako Noble of Hip Hop Congress and Julie C of B Girl Media.

This was a huge after-party for conference attendees and many of my favorite media activists were in the house. I talked with Katie Fleming of Common Cause and the Media & Democracy Coalition, based in Denver. They have big plans surrounding the Democratic National Convention, which I want to cover for Free Speech TV. I’m hoping to have Katie Fleming on Digital Crossroads between now and the end of August.

So then Sunday I checked in on a panel regarding FCC localism requirements and filing comments on the FCC website.

I had a chance to meet Bruce Fife, whose Portland-based coalition just received their construction permit. I told him they ought to hire or at least discuss supporting independent musicians via strategic music direction with Bryan Johnson, who not only helped shape KAOS music policy while serving as Music Director for two years, and interned at Prometheus Radio Project during the full-power license application window last year, but is also helping to organize the Grassroots Radio Coalition convergence in Portland coming up July 24-27.

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The second day, Friday, I was up pretty early helping out with Free Speech TV. I ran sound in their amazing and fancy satellite truck. The opening speakers represented a solid mix of viewpoints, with Yolanda Hippensteele, Josh Silver and Robert McChesney (all of Free Press) introducing Adriene Maree Brown from Ruckus Society (who was on Democracy Now! on Friday LISTEN HERE), Lawrence Lessig of Change Congress and Rep. Keith Ellison from here in Minnesota.

In the Free Speech TV lunch room, I had the opportunity to speak with Denis Moynihan and his mom. Last month, he was featured on DN! announcing he was leaving the organization to run FSTV. I spoke with him on mic, and will feature the interview on Digital Crossroads June 13th. I didn’t ask Amy Goodman to do an interview, but she is really excited about Boise Community Radio.

After lunch I kicked it with Erin Gentry at the panel on hip hop community organizing. I hope to play audio from this event on the show, featuring Julie C from 206Zulu and Reclaim the Media, Rosa Clemente from R.E.A.C.HipHop, Shamako Noble (past guest on Crossroads) of Hip Hop Congress, JR Fleming of Coalition to Protect Housing, and Toki Wright of Yo! the Movement from here in Minneapolis.

The next panel I saw was organized by the Future of Music Coalition, looking at new music services and the music industry bottom line. It was hosted by Ann Chaitovitz, the chief at Future of Music, and featured Peter Gordon of Thirsty Ear Records. They both said they would do interviews on an upcoming show. I’m curious to follow up with Peter because he said Sound Exchange, the royalty collection agency, is not as bad as I think.

Bryan Calhoun, who does A&R and new media development for Kanye West and Ludacris talked about widgets and other tools for artist promotion. Plus, Stic.Man of DeadPrez was a surprise guest on the panel and said he was there to learn too, describing his goal as “seeing how to pimp the system even more harder.” He talked about “putting the power in your hands, and no middle man.”

The consensus on the panel is that America needs to preserve network neutrality, because e-commerce shouldn’t be controlled like the physical market. Speaking from the audience, Future of Music’s Michael Bracy said Time Warner’s proposed pay-as-you-use plan could be okay, but the key is protecting the “nondiscriminatory nature” of the web in terms of content.

At this point I went to the packed 24th floor of the Hyatt for a Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting and Institute for Public Accuracy party with free beer. Nobody seemed to have a problem drinking Coors-produced brew as long as somebody else was paying. I talked to Alexandra Peterson from Media Education Foundation and Sam Husseini from Institute for Public Accuracy.

There was an awesome party at a place called The News Room, thrown by Media & Democracy Coalition and others. The free drinks flowed and I met a lot of cool people including Nan Rubin, who is kind of a queen of grassroots radio organizing and Stan Lyles from SEIU United Health Workers West.

After catching some grub at Pancho Villa on Eat Street, I caught up with blogger and video activist Josh Wolf. He talked to me off the record about his thoughts on shield laws and his run for mayor in San Francisco. I’m hoping to interview him this weekend or very soon.

So many business cards to follow up on. Thanks Free Press! This is great!

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The first day, Thursday, I spent quality travel time with Karen Toering of Reclaim the Media and Angela Ballantyne of UW Communication Studies. We arrived at the airport early in the morning, before the storms started kicking up.

Then I caught up with Nathan James of Media and Democracy Coalition, who is live-blogging the conference. I’m having JavaScript problems for some reason, so here is the link: http://phasetransitions.blogspot.com/

I was able to speak on mic with Robert McChesney of Free Press and Marc Cooper of Consumer Federation of America. Listen for this and more fresh audio on Digital Crossroads Friday June 13th and 20th.

The academic symposium was pretty cool. I attended some research presentations. I think my favorite was “Sustaining Independent Media” featuring Cynthia Cotti on LPFM licenses as agents of localism, Jessica Clark & Tracy Van Slyke on measuring media impact, Adam Davis looking at the political economy of Current TV, Caroline Nappo on the significance of librarianship for media reform. I’m hoping to have all these awesome graduate student folks on Digital Crossroads soon.

Then I caught a swim at the Hyatt and a nap.

Go to freepress.net/conference and Free Speech TV to watch events of the conference as they happen.

-Gavin

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